Linux File Server For Mac Os X

Disk Utility User Guide

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Disk Utility on Mac supports several file system formats:

  • Apple File System (APFS): The file system used by macOS 10.13 or later.

  • Mac OS Extended: The file system used by macOS 10.12 or earlier.

  • MS-DOS (FAT) and ExFAT: File systems that are compatible with Windows.

We have a Red Hat 8.0 system using Samba 2.2.7 to act as a simple file server for a few Mac OS X 10.3.3 users. Typically, the users can access the share without any problems. However, occassionally the users encounter bizarre problems with files disappearing or access denied messages. These problems occur regardless of the file type. Basic Foundation: Into the Core. If I want to compare Linux with Mac OS, then firstly, Linux itself. Here are some ways to make it easy to reconnect to shared computers and servers you frequently use: On your Mac, do any of the following: Choose Apple menu Recent Items, then choose from the list of recent servers. In the Finder, choose Go Connect to Server, click the pop-up menu to the far right of the Server Address field, then choose a recent server.

Modify and install Netatalk. Netatalk is the Open Source implementation of AFP. Mac OS X requires. How to install Linux on a Mac: Replacing OS X/macOS with Linux Running Linux inside a virtual environment is all well and good, but if you're a more seasoned Linux user you may want to replace OS.

Apple File System (APFS)

Apple File System (APFS), the default file system for Mac computers using macOS 10.13 or later, features strong encryption, space sharing, snapshots, fast directory sizing, and improved file system fundamentals. While APFS is optimized for the Flash/SSD storage used in recent Mac computers, it can also be used with older systems with traditional hard disk drives (HDD) and external, direct-attached storage. macOS 10.13 or later supports APFS for both bootable and data volumes.

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APFS allocates disk space within a container on demand. The disk’s free space is shared and can be allocated to any of the individual volumes in the container as needed. If desired, you can specify reserve and quota sizes for each volume. Each volume uses only part of the overall container, so the available space is the total size of the container, minus the size of all the volumes in the container.

Choose one of the following APFS formats for Mac computers using macOS 10.13 or later.

  • APFS: Uses the APFS format.

  • APFS (Encrypted): Uses the APFS format and encrypts the volume.

  • APFS (Case-sensitive): Uses the APFS format and is case-sensitive to file and folder names. For example, folders named “Homework” and “HOMEWORK” are two different folders.

  • APFS (Case-sensitive, Encrypted): Uses the APFS format, is case-sensitive to file and folder names, and encrypts the volume. For example, folders named “Homework” and “HOMEWORK” are two different folders.

You can easily add or delete volumes in APFS containers. Each volume within an APFS container can have its own APFS format—APFS, APFS (Encrypted), APFS (Case-sensitive), or APFS (Case-sensitive, Encrypted).

Mac OS Extended

Choose one of the following Mac OS Extended file system formats for compatibility with Mac computers using macOS 10.12 or earlier.

  • Mac OS Extended (Journaled): Uses the Mac format (Journaled HFS Plus) to protect the integrity of the hierarchical file system.

  • Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Encrypted): Uses the Mac format, requires a password, and encrypts the partition.

  • Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled): Uses the Mac format and is case-sensitive to folder names. For example, folders named “Homework” and “HOMEWORK” are two different folders.

  • Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled, Encrypted): Uses the Mac format, is case-sensitive to folder names, requires a password, and encrypts the partition.

Windows-compatible formats

Choose one of the following Windows-compatible file system formats if you are formatting a disk to use with Windows.

  • MS-DOS (FAT): Use for Windows volumes that are 32 GB or less.

  • ExFAT: Use for Windows volumes that are over 32 GB.

See alsoPartition schemes available in Disk Utility on MacAbout Disk Utility on Mac

I have two PC towers that have AMD X2 dual-core, both roughly 4xxx series.


Both run Linux fairly well, as Linux just needs much memory, fast hard disks, and a decent processor.


Both can be replicated today with 16 GB memory (assuming the mohterboard holds it) for about $1000.


If you ask the forum how much the 'Apple ordered' Java update to version 29 has caused several issues, you would likley see some wisdom to managing your own server with RedHat Enterprise Linux (annual license fee of $400) with less hardware cost than an Apple, and you get to manage system components.


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Consider also the hardware repair difficulty of 'Apple hardware at Apple Genius Bar' vs MicroCenter or Fry's online purchase of a standard graphics card.

Linux File Server For Mac Os X 10.13


If repair costs even of $1000 to Apple can be crippling (I am not judging, just offering a possible scenario), control costs by controlling all aspects.


My humble opinion.